Maintenance Techniques to Get People Back on Track

  Facilitative behaviors used during a discussion to help people get back on track: Throw-Back: Team Member: “It is not possible get through this obstacle!” Facilitator: “If it was possible, what would need to happen?” [hr] Share Observations: Facilitator: “It is very quiet.  What does the silence mean?” [hr] Review Group Agreements: Facilitator: “Remember the ground rules we discussed as we begin to talk about this event.” (If there were any established.) [hr] Check-In: If a group is really struggling or people are becoming very frustrated, interrupt the activity and ask: “So what are you doing right now that is[…]Read More…

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Start-Up Techniques

Start-Up Techniques are facilitative behaviors that create, continue or re-start a safe environment for learning. In the beginning: Get agreement on the collective focus of the group/team. By saying, “What would this group like to create today?” [hr] Inform the group that they are responsible for how well the workshop goes. By saying, “Ask yourself and give yourself an honest assessment, ‘How am I showing up right now? Is my current attitude going to help or hinder the group?  Will it help myself?’” Consider using a story like the Two Wolves to help participants emotionally connect with being present. [hr] Create guidelines or[…]Read More…

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Join or Judge

This a powerful technique to check in with people and help them make better decisions. Join or Judge is similar to Help or Hinder, but is *just* different enough to merit providing this for you and this is better used by pulling a person aside for a moment. Many people would rather sit back and criticize – judge – instead of joining in and stepping ‘outside their comfort zone’ and ‘Join’. Do not be upset by this.  It is completely natural and normal because we have been taught that judging is perfectly acceptable behavior while joining is mocked, “Looks like[…]Read More…

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Story of Two Wolves Legend

The Two Wolves Legend is a great parable to help participants make a conscious decision to actively participate. An old Cherokee is teaching his grandson about life. “A fight is going on inside me,” he said to the boy. “It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil – he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.” He continued, “The other is good – he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, and faith.” “The same fight is going[…]Read More…

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